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How to Jailbreak And Upgrade Old Android Phones
By special contributor snydeq on 2011-07-18 17:38:34
InfoWorld's Serdar Yegulalp provides an in-depth tutorial on how he rooted and upgraded his Motorola Cliq XT, one of many Android phones made infamous for not receiving further Android updates beyond 1.5. 'It turned out to be quite an odyssey, with twists and turns I describe here in order to help those who wish to embark on a similar journey,' Yegulalp writes. 'Was it worth the trouble? Yes, in the sense that learning how to jailbreak your own phone is a valuable skill, and I got much more functionality out of the Cliq, when I was expecting to simply junk it. '
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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-17
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RE: If time is a problem, get a supported phone
By pandronic on 2011-07-19 14:11:52
> I got a Google Nexus One that has always run great and continues to receive updates. What is so difficult about getting a Phone which is on the top of the list as far as devices supported directly by google?

Well, first of all I'm not going to pay full price for a phone, so I'll get a subsidized one when I have to renew my contract every two years. I've waited for the Nexus S for 6 months or more. My old phone was literally falling to pieces. Vodafone kept postponing the introduction of Nexus S into their offer, so I had to settle for a Galaxy S (which has OK updates for now, but probably no more in the future as the S2 made its way onto the market).

So really, sometimes it's not a matter of choice because it's plain ridiculous to wait for a phone for 6-12 month until the operators get off their fat asses.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE: If time is a problem, get a supported phone
By MattPie on 2011-07-19 16:55:07
> I got a Google Nexus One that has always run great and continues to receive updates. What is so difficult about getting a Phone which is on the top of the list as far as devices supported directly by google?


Besides money, the carrier. Europe doesn't have this problem, but in the US the Nexus would have to be on AT&T (or T-mobile, now bought by AT&T), whereas Verizon, who runs an entirely different network built on different tech, has much better coverage (at least on the east coast where I live). Since I tend to travel out in the middle of nowhere, getting a signal > timely updates. :)
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RE: Motorola i1
By Morgan on 2011-07-19 19:15:06
> Caveat emptor, I guess. On the plus side, this is my first smartphone, so I don't really know what I'm missing out on.

Quite a lot actually. I was in a similar situation as you, with nearly the same phone as in the article (Motorola Cliq). The official 2.1 update allowed me to run apps like Amazon Kindle and such, but it was slow and buggy, and ate the battery in half a day. I tried CyanogenMod and it worked great for the most part, but the phone's hardware just couldn't really handle the load overall. But, the fact that I was able to run 2.x-only apps more than made up for it. It's not quite Windows 95 vs Windows 7, but it is a drastic difference.

Since you are already on one of Sprint's prepaid arms, you may want to consider moving over to Virgin Mobile, where you can get a 2.1 or 2.2 device for under $200, and you will probably be able to port your number with no problem. You'll have the same coverage since it's the same carrier really, and you'll probably pay less too. I considered them when the ATT/Tmo merger was announced, but I think I will stick it out with Tmo and see if it's still decent after March 2012.
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RE[2]: Motorola i1
By TpyoKnig on 2011-07-20 09:43:58
OR Since he's already with boost mobile he could get the Samsung Galaxy Prevail or get another android phone on Boost mobile. I have an Evo on Boost. :)
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RE[3]: Motorola i1
By Morgan on 2011-07-20 10:06:38
Well, I made the suggestion based on two thoughts: One, he had indicated that he didn't use or even want the iDEN-only PTT feature, which is the only real reason to have Boost/Nextel over vanilla Sprint/Virgin. Two, Virgin offers a $25/month unlimited data/text plan with 300 peak voice minutes, which is half of Boost's normal plan. Granted, Boost will allow you to "shrink" that monthly fee with timely payments, but the floor is $35/month.

I really don't understand the huge price difference either, considering both companies are Sprint holdings. I suppose it's the added PTT functionality on Boost's side, but I don't see that being worth so much more money. If you rely on PTT that much, it would make more sense to just go with a postpaid plan.

Anyway, you're right: He could just stick with Boost and buy a new phone. He just sounded unimpressed with them to begin with. :)

Edited 2011-07-20 10:07 UTC
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RE[4]: Motorola i1
By cmchittom on 2011-07-20 20:10:29
> He just sounded unimpressed with them to begin with. ;)

I am unimpressed with them. But when I was in the market, Boost was the best of a bad lot, and were the least expensive for my usage pattern: since I'm almost always right by a landline, I don't even use the phone functionality on my cell enough to make a recurring charge of the kind anybody was offering worthwhile—I just put $25 on it every 7–10 weeks.
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RE: If time is a problem, get a supported phone
By zima on 2011-07-23 23:35:31
"Getting a supported phone, one ~3x more expensive than fairly solid & inexpensive mass Android devices (which already offer most of the benefits, not a mere 1/3), also sends a clear messages to the carriers as to what phones people prefer." (emphasis mine)

Hm, no, I think people don't prefer that (maybe even refusing on principle to pay 200% more for 20% more). Particularly when something so inexpensive as LG P500 also got Gingerbread (granted, it most likely won't go further; but 2.x line will probably remain a standard for quite a while, and when the time for the next one will really come, not only there will likely be a worthy successor to P500 / ZTE Blade / etc. ...I suspect most Nexus One owners will be also upgrading by then)

Overall, it seems smartphones might hit "good enough" much faster than PCs did (hopefully it will also mean top devices - or devices from only one manufacturer... - won't be so overrepresented in the official supported lists of things (distros?) like Cyanogenmod)
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