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MorphOS 3.5 released
By Thom Holwerda on 2014-02-17 14:28:08

The MorphOS development team is proud to announce the public release of MorphOS 3.5, which introduces support for PowerMac 7,2 machines and features various bug fixes as well as other improvements. For an overview of the included changes, please read our release notes.

They released 3.5.1 shortly after to fix a boot issue in 3.5.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-25
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Bad release notes link
By Adurbe on 2014-02-17 15:04:52
Should be;

http://www.morphos-team.net/rele...
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Still no love...
By JLF65 on 2014-02-17 21:20:25
I'm disappointed they still don't support G3 Macs. They have G3 support for other systems, and the G3 Macs are the same as the G4 (except for the occasional newer video chip), so why is there no G3 Mac support? I'd buy MorphOS for my iMac G3 in an instant if it worked.
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RE: Still no love...
By NicePics13 on 2014-02-18 13:01:45
> I'm disappointed they still don't support G3 Macs. They have G3 support for other systems
Yes, that is weird as MorphOS worked on the EFIKA that was a G2/G3 bastard without AltiVec. You still needed a Radeon card though.
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The best Amiga-like OS...
By madcrow on 2014-02-18 13:24:41
... keeps getting better. It's just a shame that the dev team has hitched its wagon so firmly to old PPC Macs. At the moment, the hardware is still cheap and plentiful on eBay and the like, but the time will come when that's no longer the case and I wonder what will happen then.
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RE: The best Amiga-like OS...
By leech on 2014-02-18 16:01:35
I'm not sure what PPC hardware they'd target other than that though. Only other PPC based systems out there are the IBM iSeries and of course the AmigaOne X1000, but I think most people buying those are running AmigaOS4 on it.

Personally I think AROS has the most future, since it's actually open source and runs on other operating systems.

It's always saddened me how fragmented the Amiga community is. I swear I want to invent a stasis bubble for my Amiga 4000D so that it never goes bad on me.
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RE: The best Amiga-like OS...
By BallmerKnowsBest on 2014-02-18 16:14:59
> ... keeps getting better. It's just a shame that the dev team has hitched its wagon so firmly to old PPC Macs. At the moment, the hardware is still cheap and plentiful on eBay and the like, but the time will come when that's no longer the case and I wonder what will happen then.

The truly funny thing is that PPC would probably occupy the same position that ARM does today, if only it hadn't been hobbled by guilt-by-association with over-priced, under-performing Apple products.
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RE[2]: The best Amiga-like OS...
By jockm on 2014-02-18 18:40:26
I am sorry, but you are going to have to back that assertion up with some facts. At the time Apple's products were the main thing keeping PPC going, outside of the the high end and low end. Nor was ARM hurt by its bad representation in the Newton.

I do embedded work (along with other kinds of engineering) and do you what I have never heard a embedded engineer say? "Oh I would never use PowerPC because of Apple".

In my experience PowerPC is used quite a bit by the embedded crowd, mostly via Xilinx FPGAs but there are others. However it is almost always at the higher end of embedded (again in my experience). I don't think I have ever seen one that ran on batteries.

And that right there is why you ARM, AVR, PIC, MIPS, 8051, MSP430, et al all get used more than PowerPC microcontrollers: Power Consumption. PowerPC has great {Insert Computing Unit of Choice} per Watt at the high end, but not at the low end. Even the Sparc microcontrollers (in the form of LEON cores) are leaner.

Only P.A Semi (now owned by Apple) with their PWRficient made good low power PowerPC cores (still not as low as the others I mentions, but not bad). They are committed to producing them for a couple more years to fulfill military contracts, but they likely won't be around much longer.
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RE[3]: The best Amiga-like OS...
By BallmerKnowsBest on 2014-02-18 19:51:28
> At the time Apple's products were the main thing keeping PPC going, outside of the the high end and low end.

Yeah, except for a little company called "IBM". Perhaps you've heard of them?

And don't bother pointing to the "AIM" alliance, it was always obvious that Apple was the third-wheel of THAT trio - it's the equivalent of a superhero team with a roster consisting of Iron Man, The Hulk, and.... Paul Blart, Mall Cop.

> Nor was ARM hurt by its bad representation in the Newton.

Maybe that's because there were numerous other consumer products using ARM, preventing it from being solely-associated with Apple in the minds of end-users.... just a thought.

> In my experience PowerPC is used quite a bit by the embedded crowd, mostly via Xilinx FPGAs but there are others.

And that just reinforces my point: PPC is a good enough arch that even Apple's negative halo couldn't kill it off entirely.
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RE[4]: The best Amiga-like OS...
By jockm on 2014-02-18 22:58:51
>
> At the time Apple's products were the main thing keeping PPC going, outside of the the high end and low end.
Yeah, except for a little company called "IBM". Perhaps you've heard of them?


Read what I wrote again. I said Apple kept PowerPC alive in the middle. IBM keeps it alive in the high end, but has nothing in the middle or low end.

Can you please point to ANY PowerPC presence IBM has in desktops or workstation type systems? Because I think you are going to have a very hard time doing so.

My point still stands.


>
> In my experience PowerPC is used quite a bit by the embedded crowd, mostly via Xilinx FPGAs but there are others.
And that just reinforces my point: PPC is a good enough arch that even Apple's negative halo couldn't kill it off entirely.


Um no. Your point was this:

> The truly funny thing is that PPC would probably occupy the same position that ARM does today, if only it hadn't been hobbled by guilt-by-association with over-priced, under-performing Apple products.


And I asked you for data to prove that. Which you haven't done, btw. I very much doubt you can, but please try. But if you argument is simple "see they use it in embedded, it must be good"; then I will invite you to look at all the weird oddball architectures still alive in embedded.

The single most popular embedded core in the embedded world is the 8051. I know no one who sings its praises, except for the fact that it is used, well supported, and more or less free. So much research has been put into making it fast and cheap that is it more or less self perpetuating. But no one really likes the architecture.

The 6800 and 6809 still live in embedded, but that is because of legacy and not because of some proof of the architecture.

I also pointed out the main reason why PowerPC doesn't have wider adoption in embedded: power usage. The reason PowerPC isn't more widespread is because IBM and Freescale never emphasized it. Xilinx did more to popularize Power in embedded than IBM or Freescale combined.

> And don't bother pointing to the "AIM" alliance


Why would I? Those three companies were effectively the only companies to do anything with the Power Architecture. IBM and Motorola (now Freescale) failed to keep the architecture competitive, IBM and Apple were the largest customers... until the Game Cube/Wii/Wii U, PS4, and XBox 360 came along. The Amiga market was so small as to be considered line noise compared to all of the others.

In my opinion Apple didn't hold the alliance back, the alliance held itself. back.

I still fail to see how any of this has anything to do with Apple — except for your apparent desire to blame them. In my opinion, you don't seem to know much about the embedded world at all.

Unless you can come back with some verifiable proof that Apple was responsible for stifling PowerPC; I have no reason to engage with you
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RE[4]: The best Amiga-like OS...
By jockm on 2014-02-18 23:22:20
I wanted to address your Newton/ARM halo comment:

> Maybe that's because there were numerous other consumer products using ARM, preventing it from being solely-associated with Apple in the minds of end-users.... just a thought.


Seperately. At the time Apple introduced the Newton (and for some years after) the only other ARM products on the market were from Acorn (ie the RISCOS stuff) and essentially was unknown anywhere outside of the UK/Europe.

ARM Holdings aggressively marketed the ARM core and licensed it everywhere they could.; but it really wasn't until DEC evolved it into a superscalar architecture — ie the StrongARM — that it really started to catch on.

There is a lot more to that story. The rise of ARM, the decline of MIPS (still very much alive in embedded, far moreso than PowerPC), and finally the RISCification of the x86 architecture. It was a really exciting time for the CPU nerds.

My real point here is to point out why ARM (and MIPS to a lesser degree) thrived when PowerPC merely has a place at the table: ARM and MIPs licensed their designs far and wide. They let others improve them, and brought these improvements back into the core design. They evolved far more quickly then the Power Architecture did.

Why? Well I believe it was because IBM wanted a top down process. They designed the cores, Motorola/Freescale manufactured them, and Apple & IBM used them.

IBM couldn't compete with the race to ever smaller die sizes, and Power was a component heavy design — ARM was quite lean by comparison. ARM manufacturers weren't limited to Motorola and IBMs fabs; ARM allow for higher yields per die (which means prices were lower and required less power).

You could see this as an example of the Cathedral vs the Bazaar; or of anything you like. But in the end ARM won over PowerPC because of its merits.
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