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Don't tell people to turn off Windows Update, just don't
By Thom Holwerda on 2017-05-15 23:08:32

Troy Hunt hits some nails on their heads:

If you had any version of Windows since Vista running the default Windows Update, you would have had the critical Microsoft Security Bulletin known as "MS17-010" pushed down to your PC and automatically installed. Without doing a thing, when WannaCry came along almost 2 months later, the machine was protected because the exploit it targeted had already been patched. It's because of this essential protection provided by automatic updates that those advocating for disabling the process are being labelled the IT equivalents of anti-vaxxers and whilst I don't fully agree with real world analogies like this, you can certainly see where they're coming from. As with vaccinations, patches protect the host from nasty things that the vast majority of people simply don't understand.

Great article, which also goes into Windows Update itself for a bit.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-30 -- 31-40 -- 41-49
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Oh, but I have had WU turned on
By darkhog on 2017-05-16 19:03:44
Up until the point Microsoft started trying to shove NSA Spydows 10 down my throat. Haven't turned it on since. As for WannaCry? Good luck trying to infect me. It used ETERNALBLUE which was a hole in SMB protocol. Guess what protocol I've never have had use for and as such it was never enabled (or ports used by it) on my computer?
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RE[2]: If only they were security updates
By darkhog on 2017-05-16 19:06:05
Were dragons there? In that fantasy story of yours? /s
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Really?
By NotGoingDumb on 2017-05-16 19:35:43
Microsoft has decades of operating systems prone to malware. Updates don't really prevent anything. Does anyone know a Windows user who wasn't affected at some point by a virus?
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RE: Really?
By dpJudas on 2017-05-16 20:02:26
> Microsoft has decades of operating systems prone to malware. Updates don't really prevent anything. Does anyone know a Windows user who wasn't affected at some point by a virus?
Yes, me. I've never had a virus. Going strong since Windows 95.

Of course, I have automatic updates on, always use an adblocker, and I don't use the snakeoil known as antivirus software.

Particular antivirus is one of the worst things ever because it fools people into thinking that it provides adequate protection against threats on the Internet.
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RE[2]: Really?
By ssokolow on 2017-05-16 20:43:04
Does it count if the only virus I ever had was on a 386 with 2MiB of RAM running MS-DOS and my age was measured in single digits at the time?

Edited 2017-05-16 20:43 UTC
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RE: If we're going to make crazy comparisons
By CaptainN- on 2017-05-16 21:21:04
MS deserves a lot of blame for the problems in Windows - oh come on - MS deserves it all - it's their baby.

It's a weird thing to be both a fan of Windows, and complain about the Windows 10 update thing, and complain about people who don't update their OS - which again, is Microsoft's fault. They make the experience excruciating - there's no reason it should take that long or require so much user input. (and why does it take so long to re-install a printer driver when you simply plug the printer into a different USB port - what a pile of crapware)

I switched to OSX years ago and while it has some quirks, in general I don't spend much time pondering the operating system, or this and that. It mostly just works, and I get to be more productive. I'm not sure why people stay on Windows at this point (I mean, I do know why - initial sticker price - some people know the price of everything and the value of nothing, or maybe "buy for price buy twice" applies).

The good news is people are moving more and more to Android and Chrome OS, which are much safer for them than Windows, which no one seems to be able to keep running.

Edited 2017-05-16 21:24 UTC
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RE: Really?
By acobar on 2017-05-16 21:25:42
Never got any viruses on any machine of mine, but fight them on many computers I support. Not from USB, CD, or any other media/mountable device. Windows is not my main OS now but I have been using it since windows 3.1 (actually, I started using MS OSes from DOS 3.x). As almost always, bad behavior/practices of users is, usually, the most important factor to spread an infection.

Granted, in a business environment it is a lot harder to protect the connected computers because we end up enabling a lot of services to make our life easier and there is always some idiot that, against all advices we give, go to somewhere they should not, click on things they are alerted to not do. Windows XP was a nightmare but it is possible to lock Windows 7 to almost death. Unluckily, many guys fight to have administrator privileges because some software they need only work properly under a high risk account, though this need has decreased over the years. The exceptions provides the path for lateral spread by using system exploits and do make things easier for crooks.

Microsoft has a large share of blame over them because of the ridiculously complex and full of holes security model they created.

Edited 2017-05-16 21:31 UTC
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If you don't want to run Windows Update
By BluenoseJake on 2017-05-16 22:58:10
Then don't run Windows. It's a part of the ecosystem, anyone who doesn't update their system is part of the problem, they allow these things to occur. This hole was patched in March, there is just no excuse.

Edited 2017-05-16 22:59 UTC
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Comment by NotGoingDumb
By NotGoingDumb on 2017-05-17 04:10:11
Update now! After 20 years of vulnerable systems...
Microsoft fixes severe 19-year-old Windows bug found in everything since Windows 95 http://www.pcworld.com/article/2...
20-year-old Windows bug lets printers install malware—patch now https://arstechnica.com/security/...
And beware of this on your updated systems Researcher Finds Way to Steal Windows Login Credentials via Chrome and SCF Files http://news.softpedia.com/news/r...
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just block them
By unclefester on 2017-05-17 09:43:43
Operating systems should be like cars. They need to be "crash" tested and banned from using the data highways if unsafe.
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