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Don't tell people to turn off Windows Update, just don't
By Thom Holwerda on 2017-05-15 23:08:32

Troy Hunt hits some nails on their heads:

If you had any version of Windows since Vista running the default Windows Update, you would have had the critical Microsoft Security Bulletin known as "MS17-010" pushed down to your PC and automatically installed. Without doing a thing, when WannaCry came along almost 2 months later, the machine was protected because the exploit it targeted had already been patched. It's because of this essential protection provided by automatic updates that those advocating for disabling the process are being labelled the IT equivalents of anti-vaxxers and whilst I don't fully agree with real world analogies like this, you can certainly see where they're coming from. As with vaccinations, patches protect the host from nasty things that the vast majority of people simply don't understand.

Great article, which also goes into Windows Update itself for a bit.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-30 -- 31-40 -- 41-49
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RE: Windows update is a scam
By w250 on 2017-05-17 12:40:52
<wall o' text warning>

i concur.
as i have been left to administrate the computers at work, even though im simply a counter person selling parts, i find windows update to be at least very annoying.

the reasons:
1. usually it strikes at some point during the workday.
2. we have very limited bandwidth, and the internet is REQUIRED to do our job.

if 1 computer decides "hey lets update" , we cannot do our jobs. we have only 4 computers on site, but WU will hog all the bandwidth, which causes our POS to disconnect from its cloud based server. thus its a DOS attack IMHO.

therefore i have elected to control WU via group policy (win 10 pro/enterprise only) and update manually after hours. additionally i download larger updates (>10MB) at home and carry them in on a flash drive, as WU sometimes can take days to download them (all the while we cannot access our POS server). yes our bandwidth is that low.

the ability to pick and choose which updates to download is NOT available, thus i use a combination of wumt_x64 to enable this functionality, download the larger ones at home as above, and WSUS offline for a backup to catch the rest.

since corporate wont upgrade our internet these measures are the ones i adopted.

my personal computers run linux or freebsd, and are also updated continuously. my kids have a win10 machine, and its set to autoupdate as that's not an issue at home where i have ample bandwidth.
Permalink - Score: 2
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Everyone in this thread...
By denis.lafronde on 2017-05-17 13:52:41
There are hundred of millions of Windows PC. Most of them update on their own without a problem. Almost everyone is using automated updates. Once a month, the computer ask to reboot. That's it. Nothing more.

No input needed, no problem to solve. If you can't find 5 minutes to reboot in your week to do the update, well... life sucks big time. But most people don't have that problem.

It's curious how all the "smart" people in this thread are the ones having problems updating, and complaining at the same time about security.If you can run Linux without a problem, I'm sure you can handle the "yes, now is a good time to reboot" button you need to press to update Windows.

Or the minuscule chance of having a problem updating is not worth it? I think people are just making excuses to bash Windows, because I suppose that's cool?

Good thing almost all PC are running automatic updates and are not run by OSnews readers.

Edited 2017-05-17 13:54 UTC
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE: Everyone in this thread...
By darknexus on 2017-05-17 14:14:31
And it's curious how someone willing to contradict those of us with actual experience simply spew insults and anecdotes about with zero proof whatever. Funny how the pot and kettle get along, eh?
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE[3]: Faults
By denis.lafronde on 2017-05-17 14:45:02
Oops wrong reply

Edited 2017-05-17 14:48 UTC
Permalink - Score: 1
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RE[2]: Everyone in this thread...
By denis.lafronde on 2017-05-17 14:48:58
Are you really doubting that the vast majority of Windows PC are updating without a problem? If that wasn't the case, the world would be paralysed every month.

And what percentage of people are doing "arcane" things to remove automated updates from their computers? Almost no one outside of the small minority that knows how to do it. Are you really doubting that most people have no idea how to do it? And won't do it? And don't care about rebooting once a month? And don't loose their shit because Windows as gain one or two new features in the update? Outside of the echochamber of techsites, the world is a very different place.

The fact is: the chance of having problems updating is very low. It's much better than the chance of running a vulnerable system.

I get it that people doesn't like giving away control to Microsoft. I love Linux for that. That's fair. But Microsoft is for the mass, and it's working pretty well most of the time. Things could be better, like anything in life, but there is almost no reason to not let the OS do it's job.

"- Oh no! MS reset my privacy settings because I was one of the unlucky few with a bug! I took me 2 minutes to remove all the "spying" (lol) again! I'm so mad I disabled updates for all my family's computers and let them become zombibotnetforDDOSattack ¯\_(ツ)_/¯"

By the way, your "actual experience" is the very definition of an anecdote.

Edited 2017-05-17 14:52 UTC
Permalink - Score: 1
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RE[2]: Windows update is a scam
By zlynx on 2017-05-17 23:55:28
Windows update uses less bandwidth than loading web sites. It tries to be as low-impact as it can be.

So if it is giving your POS trouble then your network is doomed in any case. Simply hitting the internet for a large Disqus JSON load would hurt you. Or what if your POS system is downloading an update?

You seriously need a router with QoS settings. Give your POS cloud highest priority. Now you can use the rest of the network for anything.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE[2]: Everyone in this thread...
By zlynx on 2017-05-18 00:15:50
I run a Linux home server, and a Linux laptop for work, but I also have four Windows systems (One of those is dual-boot on the Linux laptop).

All of them running Windows 10. All of them update with only minor issues.

Last year my Surface 4 Pro had an issue updating. Each time it would try to go to the Anniversary Update, it would fail and roll back. But guess what? It eventually succeeded and it never broke itself.

I've even got one of the desktops on Windows Insider updates. I've only had to reset the OS one time on that one.

My experience with the Windows updates has been pretty much positive. They will have to screw it up a lot to exceed the annoyance back in the day of upgrading from Debian woody to sarge, which took me four hours to fix and which I will remember forever. And when I rebuilt that server I went with Redhat/Fedora. Debian, bah.
Permalink - Score: 2
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But but - forced upgrades?
By torp on 2017-05-18 08:31:35
I used to allow Windows Update to do its thing automatically, but then the forced Windows 10 upgrade showed up. Now it's off.

Even if you go to Win 10, i keep reading that some of their updates break stuff. Since my only interest in Windows is games, i've noticed some warnings on Steam that games aren't yet compatible with the "Creators Update" recently.

So damned if you do, damned if you don't.
Permalink - Score: 3
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Turning Windows Update on by default is wrong.
By Nicram on 2017-05-18 10:02:09
Because it may reboot computer while working. Because it may broke something. Because it may not only patch system, but for example upgrade Windows 8 into Windows 10, and people start to cry. Because it may install not only patches, but also spying elements. Because it may reset configuration of some OS elements. So there are too many reasons to not turn it on by default.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE[3]: Windows update is a scam
By w250 on 2017-05-18 11:52:25
> Windows update uses less bandwidth than loading web sites. It tries to be as low-impact as it can be.

It uses 2.1mb of our 2.0mb internet connection (according to the task manager).

> So if it is giving your POS trouble then your network is doomed in any case. Simply hitting the internet for a large Disqus JSON load would hurt you. Or what if your POS system is downloading an update?

Our POS is cloud based, no software on the actual terminal to update ,other than windows. It is accessed by ssh over a vpn. We usually only use the actual web to do very simple things like bring up pictures of parts for the customer to "see what it looks like" if we dont have it in stock.

> You seriously need a router with QoS settings. Give your POS cloud highest priority. Now you can use the rest of the network for anything.
I do not have access to said router to do as such. I have worked within the limits i am allowed by corporate policy and/or law.

The real solution is better internet bandwidth, which seemingly is out of our reach for the time being, due to corporate not wishing to upgrade it. And yes ,it is highly frustrating as id rather just let windows update itself, but alas that is not possible due to corporate decisions.

Please note: IF WU could be scheduled, i would happily schedule it for after hours (aka weekends) and let it do its thing. I attempted to do so via the task scheduler, but windows kept reverting it back to the defaults, against my wishes.
Permalink - Score: 2

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