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Google adds Kotlin as official Android programming language
By Thom Holwerda on 2017-05-18 15:57:20

I'm a little late with all the stuff from Google I/O last night due to personal issues keeping me from my PC, so let's catch up. There's a ton of interesting stuff, but I think what OSNews readers will be interested in the most is the Android project officially adding support for Kotlin.

Today the Android team is excited to announce that we are officially adding support for the Kotlin programming language. Kotlin is a brilliantly designed, mature language that we believe will make Android development faster and more fun. It has already been adopted by several major developers - Expedia, Flipboard, Pinterest, Square, and others - for their production apps. Kotlin also plays well with the Java programming language; the effortless interoperation between the two languages has been a large part of Kotlin's appeal.

The Kotlin plug-in is now bundled with Android Studio 3.0 and is available for immediate download. Kotlin was developed by JetBrains, the same people who created IntelliJ, so it is not surprising that the IDE support for Kotlin is outstanding.

And the announcement from the Kotlin project itself:

For Android developers, Kotlin support is a chance to use a modern and powerful language, helping solve common headaches such as runtime exceptions and source code verbosity. Kotlin is easy to get started with and can be gradually introduced into existing projects, which means that your existing skills and technology investments are preserved.

As for user-facing features in Android O, it's definitely a more low-key affair than earlier releases, with most new features fitting neatly in the "huh, neat" category. With a massive low-level project like Treble underway, it makes sense for Android to not rock the boat too much with this year's release. There's Notification Dots, smarter text selection, completely redesigned emoji, and more. There's also Android Go, but I'm saving that for a later item.

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RE[4]: Great
By adkilla on 2017-05-19 00:30:28
There is, it is called Cobra:
http://cobra-language.com
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RE[2]: Thanks!
By adkilla on 2017-05-19 00:31:31
You mean Tizen?
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RE: More Info On Kotlin?
By iampivot on 2017-05-19 00:40:30
Here's a comparison to Java; https://kotlinlang.org/docs/refer...

Don't have any links for comparison to Rust, sorry.
Permalink - Score: 1
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RE[2]: Great
By Soulbender on 2017-05-19 06:33:20
Faster than with Java.
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RE[3]: Thanks!
By moondevil on 2017-05-19 08:28:00
We are discussing about Android development and all operating systems that adopted Qt/C++/QML as their official development tools failed to gain market adoption.

Even worse, none of those companies has contributed their Qt/C++/QML back to Qt folks.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE[3]: Thanks!
By moondevil on 2017-05-19 08:28:57
Tizen uses its own stack based on EFL libraries and is slowly migrating to .NET Core.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE[3]: Great
By moondevil on 2017-05-19 08:29:39
Python faster than Java?!

On which world?
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RE[5]: Great
By moondevil on 2017-05-19 08:31:02
> Cobra achieves 1 by following Python and Ruby (but not religiously). It achieves 2 by favoring static typing ("i = 5" means "i" is an integer and always will be) and leveraging .NET|Mono for machine code generation.

Doesn't look like Python to me, rather a programming language that is inspired on Python syntax.

Edited 2017-05-19 08:31 UTC
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RE[4]: Thanks!
By kwan_e on 2017-05-19 11:56:52
Yes. And what does that have to do with his preference of using Qt/C++/QML? None of those are reasons for personal preference. To put it another way you may understand, why should my personal preference for, say, The Pixies, should be affected by anyway by the fact that more people like Lady Gaga?

What I understand about Qt on mobile is it doesn't need to be the main development environment. So you listed examples of what wasn't successful on a platform level. That's not the same as being an agnostic development environment in general.

And mobile developers have to pay a licence fee, so they are giving back to Qt.
Permalink - Score: 6
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Comment by Mikaku
By Mikaku on 2017-05-19 21:34:33
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Edited 2017-05-19 21:34 UTC
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