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Oracle kills Solaris
By Thom Holwerda on 2017-09-04 22:16:16

Remember, back in December 2016, when there were rumours Oracle was killing Solaris? And how a month later, Solaris effectively switched to maintenance mode, and then to a "continuous deliver model"?

The news from the ex-Sun community jungle drums is that the January rumours were true and Oracle laid off the core talent of the Solaris and SPARC teams on Friday. That surely has to mean a maintenance-only future for the product range, especially with Solaris 12 cancelled. A classic Oracle "silent EOL", no matter what they claim.

With the hardware deprecated, my guess is that's the last of the Sun assets Oracle acquired written off. Just how good were Oracle's decisions on buying Sun?

Sun's Solaris is dead.

Bryan Cantrill on this news (this Bryan Cantrill):

As had been rumored for a while, Oracle effectively killed Solaris on Friday. When I first saw this, I had assumed that this was merely a deep cut, but in talking to Solaris engineers still at Oracle, it is clearly much more than that. It is a cut so deep as to be fatal: the core Solaris engineering organization lost on the order of 90% of its people, including essentially all management.

[...]

Judging merely by its tombstone, the life of Solaris can be viewed as tragic: born out of wedlock between Sun and AT&T and dying at the hands of a remorseless corporate sociopath a quarter century later. And even that may be overstating its longevity: Solaris may not have been truly born until it was made open source, and - certainly to me, anyway - it died the moment it was again made proprietary. But in that shorter life, Solaris achieved the singular: immortality for its revolutionary technologies. So while we can mourn the loss of the proprietary embodiment of Solaris (and we can certainly lament the coarse way in which its technologists were treated!), we can rejoice in the eternal life of its technologies - in illumos and beyond!

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Some details and sources
By vermaden on 2017-09-04 22:30:29
I have gathered some sources about this sad day here:
https://forums.freebsd.org/thread...
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Long Dead
By Macrat on 2017-09-04 22:44:43
Sun was delt a mortal blow in 2000 by the dot-com bust.

Then finally died in 2004 when Schwartz became CEO.

After that it was just a corpse to exploit.
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RE: Long Dead
By viton on 2017-09-04 23:29:29
Thanks to Schwartz, we have open-source stuff including UltraSparc T1/2 processors.
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chronicle of a death foretold...
By sergio on 2017-09-05 00:48:24
and open source Java and open source ZFS and OpenSolaris and OpenOffice and a long list of cool projects and tons of open source friendliness.

Don't get me wrong, Schwartz was a terrible CEO from an economic point of view, but for us, the community, he was like Jesus, he really believed in open source and contributed with the cause. Honestly, I think he was a good guy and you cannot be a good CEO and a good guy at the same time! xD

Regarding Solaris, well, it's sad, the best enterprise OS ever created death in the hands of the most mediocre IT company in the world. But We, Sun fans and Solaris users, already knew this since 2009. Oracle is f*ing cancer no more no less, capitalism in its most pure state. :(

Edited 2017-09-05 00:49 UTC
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goodbye sun
By MadRat on 2017-09-05 04:25:19
I was hoping some investor group would have gobbled up both Sun and Novell back in 2000. Unfortunately you had two completely divergent cultures and too much overlap between the two. And now they are both dead.
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RE: chronicle of a death foretold...
By Alfman on 2017-09-05 05:21:35
sergio,

> and open source Java and open source ZFS and OpenSolaris and OpenOffice and a long list of cool projects and tons of open source friendliness.

Don't get me wrong, Schwartz was a terrible CEO from an economic point of view, but for us, the community, he was like Jesus, he really believed in open source and contributed with the cause. Honestly, I think he was a good guy and you cannot be a good CEO and a good guy at the same time! xD

Regarding Solaris, well, it's sad, the best enterprise OS ever created death in the hands of the most mediocre IT company in the world. But We, Sun fans and Solaris users, already knew this since 2009. Oracle is f*ing cancer no more no less, capitalism in its most pure state. ;)


I also find it sad that a company that gave so much to the industry was not able to stay viable. The industry is consolidating so much that it's not enough just to keep building good technology, you have to play the offensive and take others out of the game before they take you out. This process continues until there are a couple corporations running the show.

At least we have antitrust laws that kick in at 50%, but by that point most in the market have already been slaughtered. This is the future we have to look forward to :(
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Think about what Oracle wanted
By grahamtriggs on 2017-09-05 07:33:36
The mistake here is to assume that Oracle purchased Sun to increase their revenue streams across [all] their product lines.

A lot of the decision was strategic. Sun's hardware / os was largely being brought for Oracle databases. The writing was already on the wall for that business with Oracle's move into Linux. And the move off of Sun hardware was always going to accelerate as customers sought to standardise their data centres, and reduce their TCO.

Oracle couldn't have turned the hardware business into additional revenue - but they needed to manage the transition.

Then there is the additional software. The biggest loss was probably OpenOffice - it might have been attractive, but the community moved against them.

Java hasn't gone anywhere, despite various grumblings. VirtualBox is also widely used.

But most importantly, don't overlook MySQL. In buying Sun, they managed to hoover one of their largest database competitors, without it looking like a horribly aggressive move.
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Things are not so simple
By Qetzlcoatl on 2017-09-05 08:56:43
There are some truth & some lie in all that posts.
One of the facts is that there are few hundreds developers in Solaris team right now.
SPARC team was deeply hit by that lay-off not Solaris.
And be sure, it is not simple lay-off, it is a part of internal race for power between different management groups & every thing can be radically changed in the future.
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RE: Think about what Oracle wanted
By moltonel on 2017-09-05 09:40:33
> Then there is the additional software. The biggest loss was probably OpenOffice - it might have been attractive, but the community moved against them.

Java hasn't gone anywhere, despite various grumblings. VirtualBox is also widely used.

But most importantly, don't overlook MySQL. In buying Sun, they managed to hoover one of their largest database competitors, without it looking like a horribly aggressive move.


OpenOffice.org actually benefited from being abandoned: the LO fork made improvements at a much faster pace than if they had remained under a corporate umbrella. Just a shame that the AOO fork managed to convince some people that it was the original rather than a fork, and that it refuses to acknowledge its own death.

Mysql/Mariadb is a similar story, although Oracle still does just enough Mysql development to keep current users from looking elsewere. Still, nowadays there's no good reason to keep using Mysql instead of postg^Wmariadb.

Virtualbox is still in good shape (I think ?) but containers, KVM, and Foo-on-Bar technologies have stolen the limelight. If Oracle completely killed VirtualBox today, most users would move to something else without too much trouble.

Java is slowly being handed over to the community, which is probably a good thing (the community is big enough, including corporate backers, to keep the technology in shape). Java will be better off without Oracle.
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RE[2]: chronicle of a death foretold...
By cybergorf on 2017-09-05 12:04:51
> ZFS is *NOT* OpenSource. It's not compatible with any GPL or BSD license. We had to remove it from www.harvey-os.org project due to issues about CDDL license when Harvey applied to sfconservancy.

Nevertheless it is open source, because you can read the sources.
It is not free software.
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