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Why you shouldn't unlock your phone with your face
By Thom Holwerda on 2017-09-13 21:56:57

If you value the security of your data - your email, social media accounts, family photos, the history of every place you've ever been with your phone - then I recommend against using biometric identification.

Instead, use a passcode to unlock your phone.

Can't argue with that - especially in place where law enforcement often takes a... Liberal approach to detainees.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-29
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Well ...
By WorknMan on 2017-09-14 02:02:22
The police can force me to use my fingerprint to unlock my phone, but they're not going to find anything incriminating on there. I guess they could plant something, but if they want to bust you that badly, you're screwed either way.

I'm not one of those people who say, 'If you have nothing to fear, you have nothing to hide', but I do think a lot of people are too goddamn paranoid. Of course, some people have good reason to be, but I suspect most people don't.

Edited 2017-09-14 02:04 UTC
Permalink - Score: 2
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Bares repeating
By JLF65 on 2017-09-14 02:23:21
And in many countries — including the US — the police can legally force you to use your fingerprint to unlock your phone. So they can most certainly point your phone at your face and unlock it against your will.

Biometric security is an oxymoron! Stick to passwords.
Permalink - Score: 6
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RE: Well ...
By Alfman on 2017-09-14 03:40:31
WorknMan,

> I'm not one of those people who say, 'If you have nothing to fear, you have nothing to hide', but I do think a lot of people are too goddamn paranoid. Of course, some people have good reason to be, but I suspect most people don't.

It's not about paranoia or guilt, IMHO. Instead it is about principals and whether you value our rights as individuals that our forefathers granted us in the constitution.
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RE: Well ...
By sj87 on 2017-09-14 04:49:57
You should check your definition for 'incriminating'... Anything that's illegal by law, will be incriminating in your possession. If you live in a fascist police state (USA, Russia), it is very likely that many harmless things will get you in trouble.

You also need to remember that every police officer is a human aswell. They might use your data for their own private purposes or just solely for stalking you and your family, to cause trouble to a guy who – for no specific reason – ticked them off.

Edited 2017-09-14 04:55 UTC
Permalink - Score: 5
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article flawed
By kristoph on 2017-09-14 05:05:08
The article lacks a distinction between active biometric security and passive biometric security.

A passive solution - including Touch ID - is reasonably easy to defeat. You can simply be held down and your finger used to unlock a device.

An active solution - such as Face ID - is more difficult to defeat because you need to actually have your eyes open and be looking at the device. You could be tricked into doing so, certainly, but it would be challenging ( and comical ).

Of course, anyone could use violence against you to force you to do this but that would work just as well in obtaining a password.

( Note that, like the author of the article, I have not used Face ID, so who knows if it's capable of detecting your face and attention effectively. )
Permalink - Score: 1
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RE: article flawed
By fmaxwell on 2017-09-14 06:15:42
Agreed. The article is flawed in that the author is apparently blind to the fact (pun intended) that the iPhone will not unlock if your gaze is averted.

He is also under the mistaken impression that simply unlocking an iPhone would somehow give someone the access to "all the data, social media accounts, and bank accounts that comes with it." If you unlock my iPhone, you then have to unlock 1Password separately to get access to any of that sensitive data.
Permalink - Score: 0
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Comment by Sidux
By Sidux on 2017-09-14 06:19:20
Can't wait for the new Identity ID implants.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE: article flawed
By nrlz on 2017-09-14 06:53:56
> because you need to actually have your eyes open and be looking at the device. You could be tricked into doing so, certainly, but it would be challenging ( and comical )

Take advantage of human being's natural fight-or-flight response.

1. Don't let the user know you are preparing to unlock their phone.
2. Stand behind him/her holding the phone up to their face.
3. Make a REALLY LOUD noise like glass breaking behind them.
4. Humans will naturally turn around to the source of the danger with eyes wide open.

Come to think of it, here's another way.

1. Print out a photoshopped picture of the target in an incriminating pose on high quality paper.
2. Carefully stick it on their phone so it looks like it is loaded on the phone screen.
3. Pretend that you have unlocked their phone.
4. Ask them why their phone has a picture of them doing whatever.
5. Show it to them.
6. Target looks straight at the phone in surprise and are confused by the photo.
7. Phone is unlocked.
Permalink - Score: 4
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RE: Bares repeating
By The123king on 2017-09-14 07:40:39
You'll have to tear my iPhone 5 away from my cold dead hands
Permalink - Score: 2
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Whjy I don't like face recognition
By cropr on 2017-09-14 09:13:10
For me the main issue with face recognition is that you have to move your phone in the right direction and that you have to look straight to the phone. The combination of these 2 actions takes a lot longer than a fingerprint scan, where you only have to put your finger on the sensor.
If you do that a 100 times a day, it starts counting.
Also for features like Apple Pay, this is a huge disadvantage. Apple Pay with face recognition will take longer than Apple with a fingerprint scan and also longer than a proximity chip card with a pin code
Permalink - Score: 2

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