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Microsoft finally admits Windows Phone is dead
By Thom Holwerda on 2017-10-09 19:44:19

In a series of tweets, Microsoft's Joe Belfiore has revealed that the software giant is no longer developing new features or hardware for Windows 10 Mobile. While Windows Phone fans had hoped Microsoft would update the platform with new features, it's now clear the operating system has been placed into servicing mode, with just bug fixes and security updates for existing users.

I was a first adopter of Windows Phone 7 - so much so I imported a device from the US during launch week. It was an amazing operating system to use, and I loved it. Soon, however, it became clear Microsoft was unable to attract developers to the platform, and even those applications that did make it weren't particularly good - not even the ones written by Microsoft itself, which were often simple HTML-based apps, which simply weren't good advocates for the platform. As a Windows Phone user, you were always scraping the very bottom of the barrel when it came to applications.

To make matters worse, the move to Windows NT with Windows Phone 8 was a disaster. Existing phones weren't updated, and instead, only got an entirely pointless Windows Phone 7.8 update. This didn't do anything to enamour users to the platform, which makes it all the more weird when Microsoft did it again when Windows Phone 10 was released. In any event, Windows Phone 8 did mature over its short lifetime, gaining many features other platforms had had for ages. Sadly, the application situation never improved, and to this day, the Windows Store is a ghost town.

It really sucks that Windows Phone became a victim of blatant mismanagement and market forces, because I still love the operating system and its unique UI. One day, I'll have to sit down and write the counterpart to my Palm retrospective, covering the entire PocketPC/Windows Mobile/Windows Phone era.

It's been a wild ride.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-30 -- 31-40 -- 41-50 -- 51-60 -- 61-66
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RE[2]: Best smartphone experience so far
By Wondercool on 2017-10-09 22:25:51
Unfortunately, you are probably right.

Though it looks like more and more companies realise that it's a lot cheaper to have an army of free developers doing the dirty work for you rather than paying thousands of people yourself, there might still be a cultural issue that is preventing MS from open sourcing it. Google realised that and even Oracle abandonned Solaris as there is no money in OSes unless you have full control. You don't get full control unless by historic precedent (Apple IOS and MSDOS/Windows) or making it free (Android).

It might also be that the code looks too much like Windows 10 (for desktop and server), I don't know.
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RE[2]: Best smartphone experience so far
By tylerdurden on 2017-10-09 23:22:39
Well, NT has been opensourced before. Just not willingly, or legally ;-)
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RE[5]: You think that is sad?
By ssokolow on 2017-10-09 23:41:31
SoC doesn't mean the RAM is on the chip. I know that at least the OMAP3 used in the OpenPandora and OMAP5 used in the DragonBox Pyra take separate RAM.

(It's what allowed the OpenPandora to be upgraded from 256MiB to 512 MiB very early in its lifecycle without any board redesign and what will allow them to offer both 2GiB and 4GiB variants of the Pyra without awkward "must match the built-in RAM" requirements for what chips can be used for the second two gigabytes.)

That said, there is a twist to the definition of "on the chip" which may be what you're thinking of.

Some SoCs... such as the one in my original Raspberry Pi, are designed so the RAM stacks on top of the SoC even though it's a separate chip.

Edited 2017-10-09 23:46 UTC
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Nelson where are you?
By enx23 on 2017-10-10 06:18:28
I am wondering if Nelson ( http://www.osnews.com/user/Nelso... ) has read this. Few years ago he was promoting heavily here Windows phones and how bright future they have based on quarter to quarter sales.

Edited 2017-10-10 06:20 UTC
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Embrace
By nicubunu on 2017-10-10 06:45:56
Actually, Microsoft does not really need an own phone OS now when their embrace of the Android goes to almost the entire system, from Cortana to launcher, to a browser and the office suite. And they still have the patent leverage to control the manufacturers.
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Comment by calden
By calden on 2017-10-10 08:39:40
Windows for mobile devices isn’t being canceled, only the current iteration, Windows 10 for mobile. Microsoft is instead focusing their efforts on Adromeda, yes, yes, Google also has a project that uses that name.

http://www.techradar.com/news/an... mobile OS Adromeda

Edited 2017-10-10 08:40 UTC
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RE: Nelson where are you?
By fmaxwell on 2017-10-10 08:41:26
> I am wondering if Nelson ( http://www.osnews.com/user/Nelso... ) has read this. Few years ago he was promoting heavily here Windows phones and how bright future they have based on quarter to quarter sales.
I'm sure that Microsoft would have pulled funding for Nelson's social media activity once they made the decision to kill Windows phone.
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RE: Embrace
By judgen on 2017-10-10 08:44:00
The edge on android is so far just a skin on chrome and does not use their engine.
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RE: It is a shame
By Sidux on 2017-10-10 09:18:39
Still remember when they laughed at the iPhone, they laughed at the Chromebook and mocked Android too.
They had potential soon after realising their mistake but the reality is just people no longer need Windows (Mobile or not)..
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Developers, Developers, Developers
By A.Dev on 2017-10-10 09:31:36
Never thought I'd quote Steve Balmer, but the decline of MS here and elsewhere over the last 20 years has been about their poor developer strategy.

The seeds of destruction were sown in the mid 1990 at the height of the Win95 launch - their arrogance took developers for granted - trying to ignore, crush or subvert the rise of both web and Java as crossplatform development tools for the client and server respectively.

Both the web on the client and java on the server were streets ahead in terms of developer productivity - MFC, VB and C++ all paled into comparison. MS tried to kill them but developers voted with their feet.

People in MS of course realized that Java and the features it represented ( automatic memory management, cross platform 'binaries', batteries included libraries ) was a good idea - but rather than join the rest of the industry it created it's own clone - C#/.NET. Similarly with the web - sort of trying to reinvent web markup with XAML.

While C# was and is a nicely designed language, not enough people cared - it's the platform stupid...

People had got used to being able to write cross platform stuff that just worked - why write in C# on .NET that only worked properly on Windows?
Also it took a long time to make the runtime performant - good VM's were hard.

They was also a large amount of churn on their tool set - it wasn't clear what was the future - so developers kept to the sidelines while MS sorted it's self out.

They lost a large part of a generation of developers, by putting their perceived interests above developers and assuming developers had no choice but to follow as they were the dominant platform....

They now show signs of turning that around, but I think, by and large, it's too late for propriety MS platforms.
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