www. O S N E W S .com
News Features Interviews
BlogContact Editorials
.
Apple prepares macOS for discontinuation of 32-bit app support
By Thom Holwerda, submitted by Drumhellar on 2018-02-03 14:15:01

When users attempt to launch a 32-bit app in 10.13.4, it will still launch, but it will do so with a warning message notifying the user that the app will eventually not be compatible with the operating system unless it is updated. This follows the same approach that Apple took with iOS, which completed its sunset of 32-bit app support with iOS 11 last fall.

This is good. I would prefer other companies, too, take a more aggressive approach towards deprecating outdated technology in consumer technology.

 Email a friend - Printer friendly - Related stories
.
Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-30 -- 31-40 -- 41-50 -- 51-60 -- 61-70 -- 71-80 -- 81-90 -- 91-94
.
RE: The Myth of 64 bits
By ahferroin7 on 2018-02-05 12:53:29
So you're seriously dealing with enough pointers that it actually matters that they double in length on a platform that pretty much universally has at least 4G of RAM these days?

If that's the case, then you probably need to be re-evaluating how your code is written, as it can almost certainly be made far more memory efficient. Even the Linux kernel doesn't have double the memory footprint when built 64-bit that it does when built 32-bit, and it uses pointers all over the place and it has a very large number of other data structures that are larger on a 64-bit kernel.
Permalink - Score: 3
.
Ouch
By darknexus on 2018-02-05 14:30:34
On one hand I completely understand the rationale behind this, and I can't even disagree from a technological standpoint. However, this is going to break a lot of stuff, particularly driver and associated applications that go with those drivers. A lot of perfectly working hardware will end up useless because of this change, since manufacturers don't bother to update their drivers most of the time.
Permalink - Score: 3
.
RE[6]: Comment by ssokolow
By Alfman on 2018-02-05 14:40:26
fmaxwell,

> That's like contending that x86 Linux binaries should run on x86 Windows computers because they use the same hardware "technology."

Or, to stick with your analogy: a car stereo manufacturer choosing to support MP3 & WMA, but not OGG.

I'm not sure if you knew this but MS actually does support Linux binaries on Windows 10:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/...


> This is about the OS, not the CPU. It's about Apple deciding to retire a lot of code in their OS by dumping support for 32 bit apps.

Yes, exactly. Obviously the hardware still supports 32bit code.

> You can talk in vague terms about how things are "largely the same technology," but the 32 bit apps can't run any more and it's not because Apple incorporated something in their OS to block execution of 32 bit apps that would otherwise run without a problem.

Hypothetically users could provide their own 32bit libraries even if apple does not, however this could only work if apple did not take steps to block 32bit software from the application loader.


IMHO there is a more fundamental problem for users than 32bit versus 64bit, which is being dependent on proprietary software that cannot be updated/ported to new architectures in the first place.


> P.S. Thanks for the link, but I've been developing in assembly since 1980.

Awesome, I'm always happy to meet other assemblers :)
Permalink - Score: 3
.
RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
By Bill Shooter of Bul on 2018-02-05 14:58:10
Yeah, maybe that really started affecting people five years ago. So 1995-2015 I think twenty years is a good warning time to give people to migrate off a technology.
Permalink - Score: 2
.
RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
By BluenoseJake on 2018-02-05 18:46:38
32 Bit software is not equivalent to 8 trax, or cassettes, but that's cool, if you want to pretend that it is.

Oh, and someone who uses both, Macs maybe slightly more stable than windows, but i hazard a guess that's more likely because of the locked down, semi obsolete hardware in most macs, not the ability to run legacy software. Windows has to run on a very complex and crazy mix of hardware, and there is lots evidence OS X er...sorry, macOS isn't designed to the same standard. It runs well on a very small subset of the pc ecosystem.

Edited 2018-02-05 18:54 UTC
Permalink - Score: 3
.
RE[4]: Comment by ssokolow
By BluenoseJake on 2018-02-05 18:48:40
But even today, you can buy a 32 bit version of Windows 10. That'll run your crusty old dos or 16bit Windows app. It'll go away eventually, but it exists right now.

Edited 2018-02-05 18:48 UTC
Permalink - Score: 3
.
RE: The Myth of 64 bits
By grat on 2018-02-05 19:43:19
I presume this means you're storing a "char" (8 bit) as a 64 bit value?

If your code doesn't distinguish between bytes, short and long ints, perhaps you should put the keyboard away before you hurt someone.

Unless your code is spewing off pointers by the bucket, the extra 4 bytes per pointer shouldn't be costing you more than a kilobyte or two (256 pointers will cost you 1k. Are you really using thousands of variables in your code??).
Permalink - Score: 2
.
RE[2]: Not a good thing
By Kochise on 2018-02-05 20:04:30
Then tell me why 80% of x64 laptops sold are with just 4GB of RAM ? What's the point ?
Permalink - Score: 1
.
RE[5]: Comment by ssokolow
By darknexus on 2018-02-05 20:12:26
> But even today, you can buy a 32 bit version of Windows 10. That'll run your crusty old dos or 16bit Windows app. It'll go away eventually, but it exists right now.
I see you haven't actually tried to run a 16-bit DOS app in Windows 10. Maybe you should try it before you say it will run any 16-bit app someone may need.
Permalink - Score: 1
.
RE[3]: Not a good thing
By darknexus on 2018-02-05 20:14:11
Because OEMs and retail stores will foist the cheapest crap they can on to unaware customers, that's why. And then they can make a fortune on selling RAM upgrades to those same customers who don't know any better.
Permalink - Score: 1

Read Comments 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-30 -- 31-40 -- 41-50 -- 51-60 -- 61-70 -- 71-80 -- 81-90 -- 91-94

No new comments are allowed for stories older than 10 days.
This story is now archived.

.
News Features Interviews
BlogContact Editorials
.
WAP site - RSS feed
© OSNews LLC 1997-2007. All Rights Reserved.
The readers' comments are owned and a responsibility of whoever posted them.
Prefer the desktop version of OSNews?