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Intel made smart glasses that look normal
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-02-07 01:10:31

The most important parts of Intel’s new Vaunt smart glasses are the pieces that were left out.

There is no camera to creep people out, no button to push, no gesture area to swipe, no glowing LCD screen, no weird arm floating in front of the lens, no speaker, and no microphone (for now).

From the outside, the Vaunt glasses look just like eyeglasses. When you’re wearing them, you see a stream of information on what looks like a screen - but it’s actually being projected onto your retina.

This looks amazing. I'm not entirely sure if I, personally, have any use for this, but such basic, simple, handsfree information could be invaluable to, for instance, construction workers, farmers, police officers, or other people who do hard, dangerous work with their hands.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-30 -- 31-36
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RE: Retinal projection
By Anachronda on 2018-02-07 22:47:17
Always mount a scratch <strike>monkey</st rike> retina.
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RE[4]: Retinal projection
By Alfman on 2018-02-07 22:48:59
kwan_e,

> While I completely agree that our current methods of assessment can do with some assessment themselves, I think there are still benefits from training our brains to be able to do the hard work.

Yes of course, I didn't mean to imply otherwise, haha. IMHO the goal of offloading things to tech is to free our brains to become more proficient at more advanced topics and maximizing our potential. Encouraging the use of tools in the classroom and on tests could, in effect, allow us to redefine what's "hard".

> Imagine if we recovered and retaught the medieval techniques for memorization, like the mind-palace. You can actually learn to be very creative by figuring out how your own brain works.

It's true, there's alot to be said for creativity, I never felt like my school or university did a great job at encouraging it. In many instances I even felt punished for going out of the box. I guess we could debate whether the use of artificial aides enhances or stifles creativity, but I don't think they have to be mutually exclusive. I also wonder about the drugs that many musicians/artists use to expand their creativity, I don't know if they have merit?


> Timed tests/exams for specific subjects rarely occur in the workplace so it's funny how people think they can assess anything remotely close to workplace performance.

This resonates with me. Regurgitating facts for a test is completely irrelevant to anything I've done on the job. Could just be me, but I kind of wish I experienced more real world scenarios in my educational years. Real world isn't all roses of course, but I might have been better prepared to set expectations and evaluate job opportunities.
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RE: Looks dorky, but not creepy
By Bill Shooter of Bul on 2018-02-07 23:05:50
Agree strongly. Glasses should be display only, connected to smartphone which provides the smarts on what to display when.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE[4]: Retinal projection
By grat on 2018-02-08 00:28:36
In high school, my physics instructor always had a sheet on the back of the test with all the equations and constants we'd need to solve the test questions (and usually a number of extraneous equations and constants).

His philosophy (and this was pre-internet), was that with things like the CRC handbook available, memorizing equations was a waste of time-- understanding the problem, and thus knowing *which* equations to use, was more important.
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RE[3]: Retinal projection
By Brendan on 2018-02-08 01:39:38
Hi,

> It's just a thought, maybe one day not allowing technology on tests will be considered Luddite :)

How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?

- Brendan
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RE[5]: Retinal projection
By kwan_e on 2018-02-08 02:02:03
> In high school, my physics instructor always had a sheet on the back of the test with all the equations and constants we'd need to solve the test questions (and usually a number of extraneous equations and constants).

In Western Australia, at least around my era of the TEE (the university entrance exam), all exams allowed anyone to take in one A4 sheet with notes on one side. It was up to you to choose what to put on it.

Of course, we also had graphics calculators and there were no limits on what programs you had.
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RE[4]: Retinal projection
By Alfman on 2018-02-08 03:05:15
Brendan,

> How would you feel knowing that the surgeon that's about to cut you open learnt nothing during medical school and only passed because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?

Students still need to learn and surgeons would still need to be evaluated for competency, but why would it be a bad thing for them to learn and be evaluated based on the more realistic conditions that they'll see in the real world?

I think if they're denied the use of reference material on exams in medical school then there's a very serious risk that tests end up promoting the wrong skills and doctors will become proficient at memorizing answers for the tests but quickly forget it later on. I've seen it first hand how some people can get high grades by memorizing the answers and still be highly incompetent.

Arguably the best doctors will be the ones who can make the best diagnoses regardless of how they find it. To the extent that they're going to have access to technology on the job, then IMHO it makes the most sense for them to train and test with it so that finding answers among the mountains of knowledge becomes ingrained as second nature.


It occurs to me that I ignored the later part of your post "...because their friend fed them the answers during their exams?" and as such I may have answered a different question than the one you asked. Oops. I'll leave what I already wrote, but I do agree that everyone should do their own work! :)

Edited 2018-02-08 03:08 UTC
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RE[5]: Retinal projection
By dpJudas on 2018-02-08 04:38:52
> Students still need to learn and surgeons would still need to be evaluated for competency, but why would it be a bad thing for them to learn and be evaluated based on the more realistic conditions that they'll see in the real world?
Sometimes it is needed to learn the basics of a subject before you can build on top of it. This is in particular important in math.

Those tests can rarely be realistic as usually the basics are automated in computer programs and tools. If you allow someone to google the solution they will often find the answer, but that doesn't mean they understand why the answer works or could create it from scratch.
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RE[6]: Retinal projection
By Alfman on 2018-02-08 06:30:51
dpJudas,

> Sometimes it is needed to learn the basics of a subject before you can build on top of it. This is in particular important in math.

Those tests can rarely be realistic as usually the basics are automated in computer programs and tools. If you allow someone to google the solution they will often find the answer, but that doesn't mean they understand why the answer works or could create it from scratch.


Sure, I agree with that, we need to understand how pieces fit together, but I would suggest this is a already a pre-existing problem in the way schools teach today (or at least as I experienced it). Grading incentives can encourage short term memorization over analytical thinking.

I doubt most teachers were ever trained to teach effectively with computers, but I actually think given the right tools it could be highly effective in increasing understanding of the subject over traditional pencil and paper and one way presentations. Even when you've learned the material enough to solve problems on a math quiz, a solid understanding of how variables interact with each other can remain elusive. For example, I "learned" the euler equations and tayler series in school but it was vague and I didn't truly grasp them until later in life with better visualization tools at my disposal. I have more confidence in my own understanding of them than I had in school even though I was able to solve the equations.

For people like me who learn best with a hands on approach, there's simply no textbook alternative to using a spreadsheet/numerical analysis/cad program to truly interact with the data. Personally, I learn better with technology than without; I suspect many people are the same way. Moreover, those who mastered problem solving with technology will be far better situated for the professional world than someone who's merely book smart with formulas that can be looked up. I plan to teach my own kids complex math using computers, should they express any interest :)


You do raise valid concerns, but IMHO it's nevertheless a net benefit. Anyways, enough of my opinion, I was curious what others think, thank you for your opinion! I totally hijacked the conversation, but I don't have much to say about intel's smart glasses haha.
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RE: ads
By The123king on 2018-02-08 08:22:57
They'd be truly targetted ads then!
Permalink - Score: 1

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