www. O S N E W S .com
News Features Interviews
BlogContact Editorials
.
Chrome to start blocking annoying ads
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-02-13 19:31:00

The web is an incredible asset. It's an engine for innovation, a platform for sharing, and a universal gateway to information. When we built Chrome, we wanted to create a way for people to interact with the magic that is the web, without the browser getting in the way. We created a browser that took up minimal space on your screen, made the omnibar so you could quickly search or get directly to a website, and built our pop-up blocker to help you avoid unwanted content. Since then we’ve also added features such as Safe Browsing, pausing autoplay Flash and more - all aimed at protecting your experience of the web.

Your feedback has always played a critical part in the development of Chrome. This feedback has shown that a big source of frustration is annoying ads: video ads that play at full blast or giant pop-ups where you can’t seem to find the exit icon. These ads are designed to be disruptive and often stand in the way of people using their browsers for their intended purpose - connecting them to content and information. It's clear that annoying ads degrade what we all love about the web. That's why starting on February 15, Chrome will stop showing all ads on sites that repeatedly display these most disruptive ads after they've been flagged.

Good news for those still not using an adblocker, and bad news for sites that repeatedly display annoying ads.

 Email a friend - Printer friendly - Related stories
.
Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-25
.
The cynic in me
By darknexus on 2018-02-13 19:44:12
Sounds great, but many of these annoying--or worse yet, malicious--ads are hosted on Google's own ad network. Are they going to block these as well? Hmmm...
Permalink - Score: 6
.
Comment by Alfman
By Alfman on 2018-02-13 21:58:54
Thom Holwerda,

> Good news for those still not using an adblocker, and bad news for sites that repeatedly display annoying ads.


Everything that interrupts the requested content is inherently "annoying", I can't get over how annoying youtube has gotten without an ad blocker. If google were to take user annoyance seriously, they'd have to block their own ads as well...unless of course this is mostly a ploy to block other advertisers.


I admit, I resent most of what the advertisement industry does, including google. However putting my biases aside, I still think this crosses antitrust boundaries. Google are facing lots of criticism and boycotts from some major companies, but being able to control access to chrome and firefox users (through the adblock plus deal) gives google an insane amount of leverage over partners and competitors.
Permalink - Score: 4
.
RE: Comment by Alfman
By tidux on 2018-02-13 22:04:41
That's why everyone jumped ship to uBlock Origin years ago.
Permalink - Score: 5
.
RE: The cynic in me
By Bill Shooter of Bul on 2018-02-13 22:14:47
No, of course not. This is about blocking *other* ad companies ads that don't comply with the industry standards that google may or may not have taken credit for writing them.
Permalink - Score: 5
.
There are some ads
By Earl C Pottinger on 2018-02-13 22:33:22
Things I can do without:

1) Ads that blast music at 100% volume, even if the ad is off-screen you have this loud noise.

2) Even while I dislike the websites that are 2/3 ads and the text you want to read is just in the middle, this is still better than those sites that want to pop-over ads and block what I want to read.

3) Ads with small and/or hide to find close buttons. Make it so the top/right hand corner always is a close button.

4) Web pages you can not exit or close. If I hit the close button on a tab - that tab should CLOSE!
Permalink - Score: 5
.
RE: There are some ads
By Invincible Cow on 2018-02-13 23:01:50
4). For Firefox, in about:config, set dom.disable_beforeunload = true.
Permalink - Score: 5
.
RE[2]: Comment by Alfman
By Alfman on 2018-02-14 00:36:47
tidux,

> That's why everyone jumped ship to uBlock Origin years ago.

Well, yes we did, but do you have numbers to back up a claim that "everyone" did? I genuinely do not know, so if anyone has a link comparing market stats of the two that would be great!
Permalink - Score: 3
.
No cookie for you...
By Risthel on 2018-02-14 11:01:18
Trusting Chrome to Block ads is like trusting Sesame Street Cookie Moster to guard a Jar full of Cookies.
Permalink - Score: 6
.
Comment by kurkosdr
By kurkosdr on 2018-02-14 11:21:56
Nice gesture, but as long as ads can run arbitrary scripts on my computer I will keep my uBlock origin and Brave Browser, thank you.

Edited 2018-02-14 11:22 UTC
Permalink - Score: 1
.
RE[3]: Comment by Alfman
By Morgan on 2018-02-14 12:30:01
Not to mention there are at least two fake "uBlock" plugins for Firefox and Chrome pretending to be the real thing, which actually track and sell off the user's browsing habits (something I find even worse than the advertising itself).

Beyond that, I've seen dozens of fake ad blockers using the "uBlock" name and logo in the app stores for iOS, Android, and Windows. Who knows what nefarious intent is behind those apps.

So yes, telling all your friends to switch to uBlock Origin is great, but unless they are careful they may not be using the real thing at all, and are at even greater risk than before.
Permalink - Score: 4

Read Comments 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-25

No new comments are allowed for stories older than 10 days.
This story is now archived.

.
News Features Interviews
BlogContact Editorials
.
WAP site - RSS feed
© OSNews LLC 1997-2007. All Rights Reserved.
The readers' comments are owned and a responsibility of whoever posted them.
Prefer the desktop version of OSNews?