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Looking at Lumina Desktop 2.0
By Thom Holwerda, submitted by judgen on 2018-03-13 01:10:10

TrueOS, formerly PC-BSD, has a desktop environment called Lumina. It's getting a big overhaul for Lumina 2.0, and this short interview gives some more details about what's coming.

With Lumina Desktop 2.0 we will finally achieve our long-term goal of turning Lumina into a complete, end-to-end management system for the graphical session and removing all the current runtime dependencies from Lumina 1.x (Fluxbox, xscreensaver, compton/xcompmgr). The functionality from those utilities is now provided by Lumina Desktop itself.

[...]

The entire graphical interface has been written in QML in order to fully-utilize hardware-based GPU acceleration with OpenGL while the backend logic and management systems are still written entirely in C++. This results in blazing fast performance on the backend systems (myriad multi-threaded C++ objects) as well as a smooth and responsive graphical interface with all the bells and whistles (drag and drop, compositing, shading, etc).

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-30 -- 31-38
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massively bloated
By unclefester on 2018-03-13 01:44:39
It is just as slow and bloated as Windows 10. The App Cafe defeats the primary strength of BSD - the ports.

Recommended Requirements

64-bit processor
4 GB of RAM
20 - 30 GB of free hard drive space on a primary partition for a graphical desktop installation.
Network card
Sound card
3D-accelerated video card

https://www.trueos.org/handbook/i...

All we really need is a polished desktop BSD with a very simple installation process.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE: massively bloated
By Flatland_Spider on 2018-03-13 03:09:40
Egh. PC-BSD never played nicely with ports. My PC-BSD installs usually ended up being incredibly broken because of adding ports.

Don't get me wrong. Ports with a build server are why I really like FreeBSD on servers, but the binary packages have gotten much better in the last decade.

I'm going to go out on a limb and say most of those requirements are due to running ZFS as the default FS. 20-30GB of disk space is right inline with Fedora Workstation install needs, by the way. I can be squeezed into a smaller space, but long term, it's going to need about 40GB.

3D acceleration is just the bar these days for GUIs.

OpenBSD is nice. Clean, tight, minimalist.
Permalink - Score: 5
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PC-BSD / TrueOS and Ports
By DrJohnnyFever on 2018-03-13 04:15:43
In current versions of TrueOS everything is implemented using packages in the back end (even the base system is packaged) the old PBIs are dead. When you install something with AppCafe it installs the relevant packages (there is a cli for everything as well). The primary reason for the fairly steep system requirements are due to root-on-ZFS.
Permalink - Score: 2
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Whoa
By Poseidon on 2018-03-13 06:04:32
I've been out of the loop on the PC-BSD for a long time I guess. Last time I used it, it came with KDE and was a install/user friendly alternative to Desktop-BSD while trying to overhaul the file-system.

Need to give this version a shot.

As for the requirements, it's almost for sure due to 64-bit system operation, you don't want to be memory starved while running the OS and apps. You could probably get by on less memory, but the system will start thrashing when it fills up the memory while multitasking.
Permalink - Score: 1
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Crashing
By nicubunu on 2018-03-13 07:12:51
I would not feel comfortable with the idea that any script or tool crash will crash your entire desktop. I see it is labeled as a security "feature", but to me it looks like very user unfriendly.
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE: massively bloated
By Moonbuzz on 2018-03-13 07:34:02
> It is just as slow and bloated as Windows 10. The App Cafe defeats the primary strength of BSD - the ports.

TrueOS, as the name hints, is yet another case of a nice idea - Beginner-friendly-desktop-d irected FreeBSD - becoming a Silicon Valley mess. Once the money entered the scene, it's goodbye good ideas and hello crap wrapped in the most ridiculous brand name in tech history.

You can see the same line of thinking in Canonical with their "Unity on Mir" which has now, a few dozens of millions of dollars down the drain later, became "Gnome on Wayland".
Permalink - Score: 4
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RE: Crashing
By Delgarde on 2018-03-13 10:06:45
> I would not feel comfortable with the idea that any script or tool crash will crash your entire desktop. I see it is labeled as a security "feature", but to me it looks like very user unfriendly.

Yes, that was my reaction too. Running the entire desktop in a single (multi-threaded) process does have some advantages for performance and memory efficiency, but it sounds like a nightmare for reliability... any bug anywhere in that code has the ability to crash the entire user session. There's a reason why the big desktops favour multi-process models, where potential problems can be isolated...

Plus, the entire thing is multi-threaded C++... and while I concede that it's possible to write good multi-threaded C++ code, it's damned hard to get right. There's a reason the Mozilla guys looked at the idea of better exploiting multi-threading in their C++ codebase, and decided that the first step was to design a new language to do it in...
Permalink - Score: 2
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Lumina
By jessesmith on 2018-03-13 13:58:23
Almost all the comments so far are about PC-BSD/TrueOS rather than Lumina, so I want to toss in some of my experience with the desktop. One thing I like about Lumina is it's very portable - minimal dependencies allow it to run on almost any UNIX-like platform, including odd systems like GNU/kFreeBSD.

I ran Lumina for a little over a year, with various window managers (the default Fluxbox and Kwin mostly). It's light, it doesn't have many features, but is pleasantly flexible. Almost everything can be moved, resized or rethemed.

My only serious concern, riding the desktop from about version 0.8 through to 1.3, was that each update introduced a lot of changes. It was still a growing project and each new release relied on new packages, changed the look or location of items. It meant rapid progress, but also some re-learning if you were staying on the cutting edge.

I'm curious to see how the new, unified stack works out. One complaint I had with Lumina in the past was I didn't like the way the underlying Fluxbox WM does some things, and swapping in an alternative window manager would break short-cut keys or other little features. Having the desktop be the window manager will (I'm hoping) fix all the little problems which came up with communication between the desktop and the window manager.
Permalink - Score: 5
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ZFS?
By grat on 2018-03-13 17:11:07
I thought ZFS still required ECC memory?
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE: Crashing
By DrJohnnyFever on 2018-03-13 17:15:12
Would you rather have your desktop environment crash and restart or have a component crash and have things break in unexpected and unpredictable ways with little indication as to why?

Crash big and crash now.

Linux bug_on vs warn_on is the same discussion.
Permalink - Score: 2

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