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GDPR will pop the adtech bubble
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-05-14 19:52:31

"Sunrise day" for the GDPR is 25 May. That's when the EU can start smacking fines on violators.

Simply put, your site or service is a violator if it extracts or processes personal data without personal permission. Real permission, that is. You know, where you specifically say "Hell yeah, I wanna be tracked everywhere."

Of course what I just said greatly simplifies what the GDPR actually utters, in bureaucratic legalese. The GDPR is also full of loopholes only snakes can thread; but the spirit of the law is clear, and the snakes will be easy to shame, even if they don't get fined. (And legitimate interest - an actual loophole in the GDPR, may prove hard to claim.)

Toward the aftermath, the main question is What will be left of advertising - and what it supports - after the adtech bubble pops?

I'm skeptical of the GDPR actually changing anything, but who knows.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-16
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Permission
By WorknMan on 2018-05-14 19:59:05
> Simply put, your site or service is a violator if it extracts or processes personal data without personal permission. Real permission, that is. You know, where you specifically say "Hell yeah, I wanna be tracked everywhere."

So does that mean poor EU folks are going to get a permissions popup on every site they visit? It's like the site notification nag clusterf--k all over again.

Edited 2018-05-14 19:59 UTC
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RE: Permission
By kurkosdr on 2018-05-14 20:57:04
> So does that mean poor EU folks are going to get a permissions popup on every site they visit? It's like the site notification nag clusterf--k all over again.

Gawd I hate these notification pop-ups. Basically they are the digital version of "agree to everything we say or no soup for you". If I have no choice on the matter, what's the point of clicking "accept"? Even if I bypass the "understood and accept" screen using some creative hackery it would still count as if I accepted the terms, so it's like the "accept" button does anything.

Tech companies are like the landlords of old who forced you sign a contract full of abusive terms, otherwise no housing for you. We need some regulation of those terms-of-service agreements like we have for landlord contracts, stat.

Edited 2018-05-14 21:06 UTC
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Ads are a scam anyway
By Darkmage on 2018-05-14 20:58:43
Proctor and Gamble axed their online advertising budget and actually saw revenues increase. Online advertising is garbage that noone actually pays attention to. Yes having a web presence is important in terms of having a good website and an easy to use purchasing interface. But actually getting your brand out on the internet is silly aside from being in search engine results.

http://www.adweek.com/brand-mark...
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RE: Ads are a scam anyway
By kurkosdr on 2018-05-14 21:17:29
> Proctor and Gamble axed their online advertising budget and actually saw revenues increase. Online advertising is garbage that noone actually pays attention to. Yes having a web presence is important in terms of having a good website and an easy to use purchasing interface. But actually getting your brand out on the internet is silly aside from being in search engine results.

http://www.adweek.com/brand-mark...

Not to mention that online ads have the stench of actual scams lingering all around them. I refuse to trust an advertising medium which delivers ads that want to give me a free iPad or want to introduce me to hot singles in my area. I won't even click on the banner. Most of the links are encrypted anyways and who knows what's on the other end.

Edited 2018-05-14 21:25 UTC
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RE: Permission
By project_2501 on 2018-05-14 21:31:19
No.

The GDPR requires user acceptance to be meaningful and a genuine choice.

So false choices like "click here to accept or you get no service" are no longer valid agreements.

This is a big change.

In the longer term this will cause 2 things to happen:

1. some services will start charging to be sustainable - fine
2. some users will accept providing their personal data in exchange for services
Permalink - Score: 6
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Comment by Aeyoun
By Aeyoun on 2018-05-14 22:12:52
> I'm skeptical of the GDPR actually changing anything, but who knows.

Haven’t you seen how much the web has already changed? Just look at the changes Google have already made to AdSense and DoubleClick to comply with the GDPR! Publishers can opt-in to non-personalized ads or are otherwise required to prompt for consent before enabling personalized ads and profiling.

https://www.ctrl.blog/entry/adsen...

Edited 2018-05-14 22:15 UTC
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this will end badly
By tidux on 2018-05-15 00:22:33
The extraterritorial assertions in GDPR will be its undoing. It will go something like this.

1. A service is created hosted entirely in the US.
2. Some small number of EU citizens sign up.
3. EU orders the service provider to delete data or attempts to fine them, under GDPR.
4. Service provider tells the EU to go f--k itself and makes a big stink on social media or to their Congressman.

At this point either the EU backs down and the GDPR loses all its teeth, or the US government will exact trade penalties on the EU unless and until the GDPR is repealed.

I worked in the hosting industry for years, and citing the First Amendment was typically the response to butthurt foreigners screaming about some piece of content that our customers had hosted, if they didn't have a valid DMCA takedown request.

Edited 2018-05-15 00:25 UTC
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RE[2]: Permission
By bhtooefr on 2018-05-15 00:59:58
And there's also already services that have taken a "move out of Europe or get no service" stance enforced by geolocation.
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RE[3]: Permission
By VistaUser on 2018-05-15 01:26:19
Which then allows local services to be developed that do comply with EU regulations.

Globa companies will hae the choice to play ball or allow competitors to emerge.
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RE: this will end badly
By grat on 2018-05-15 01:26:24
> I worked in the hosting industry for years, and citing the First Amendment was typically the response to butthurt foreigners screaming about some piece of content that our customers had hosted, if they didn't have a valid DMCA takedown request.

First amendment usually doesn't apply to privately hosted services-- It prevents the *government* from being anti-free speech, not private entities.

The line between "anti-free speech" and "discrimination", however, can get pretty squirrely, and that's when the lawyers earn their money.

Personally, I still feel the best middle ground is that you should be allowed to say / host what you want-- but that you aren't immune from the consequences.
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