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The US net neutrality repeal is official.
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-06-11 23:04:35

It’s official. The Federal Communications Commission's repeal of net neutrality rules, which had required internet service providers to offer equal access to all web content, took effect on Monday.

The rules, enacted by the administration of President Barack Obama in 2015, prohibited internet providers from charging more for certain content or from giving preferential treatment to certain websites.

Great news. This will enable honest, trustworthy, transparant, and customer-focused companies like Comcast to take control of the internet. This can only mean good things for American consumers, and will ensure that they remain free of the confusing and heavy burden of ISP choice. In turn, the "market" will remain carved up by at best two large monopolies, which is clearly the best type of market in the universe.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-15
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RE: New times ahead
By Phloptical on 2018-06-12 22:26:44
It’s a boon for private VPN providers and the new Ma Bells of the US

Competing ISPs won’t be able to sniff existing municipalities.
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RE[2]: New times ahead
By ssokolow on 2018-06-13 02:08:56
> It’s a boon for private VPN providers and the new Ma Bells of the US

Competing ISPs won’t be able to sniff existing municipalities.


How's it a boon for VPN providers? They'll probably do what Bell Canada did here (before we scared our Republican Lite government into forcing a change) and throttle any traffic not recognizably on their whitelist down to 30KB/s.

Edited 2018-06-13 02:09 UTC
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE: Only getting better.
By Mx9001 on 2018-06-13 02:18:07
Well, we didn't vote.
We let the old people pick the President.
And you know what old people come out to vote every election, year after year. And then they break the system: Gerrymandering.
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE[3]: New times ahead
By Phloptical on 2018-06-13 13:46:51
You may be right. Although that would really suck for the person who works from home and is using his corporate VPN for business purposes, and not to hide from the Comcast’s Netflix and Xbox live throttle, uploading torrents, and porn.

If I want tiered broadband, and since these Republican jerkoffs want to charge internet like a utility, then I want actual usage based pricing. Small monthly fee, and Pay per Use.
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE[4]: New times ahead
By ssokolow on 2018-06-15 05:50:30
The problem is that there are two reasons (other than bilking customers) to choose a given pricing model:

1. Per-unit cost plus markup (eg. electricity generation, water delivery, etc.)

2. Amortized maintenance and upgrade (eg. public roads)

Given that wires wear with weather and time, like roads, a flat rate for a given bandwidth level is the most natural way to price network connectivity.

In fact, per-unit data transfer with some credit bundled into the base monthly fee is actually detrimental to traffic management because it causes traffic to bunch up at the beginning and end of the billing period more than a flat-rate plan.

(The beginning because people have so much bandwidth left that they don't feel a need to be cautious and the end because people are rushing to use up the rest of what they paid for before it resets.)

...and, if you don't bundle a base amount of monthly credit into it, then you get the exact reason micropayments have invariably failed and flat-rate schemes tend to win out over a la carte bandwidth pricing when the buyer isn't trying to stretch a tight budget. (There's no amount of money that's large enough to be worth collecting yet small enough for it to not weigh on the client's mind, so people prefer to pay for the peace of mind of not having to think about it.)

Clay Shirky wrote an article about this effect back in 2000.

https://web.archive.org/web/20010...

Things like Flattr have been seeing some success because they compromise. Users decide on a flat amount that they pay per time period, regardless of what they do, and then it gets divided among the content they consume.

Edited 2018-06-15 05:59 UTC
Permalink - Score: 2

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