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ARM launches PR attack on RISC-V
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-07-09 19:18:46

Anybody remember Microsoft's "get the facts" campaign? Well, ARM is having its "get the facts" moment, with the British company launching a site to disparage the open source RISC-V architecture.

The instruction set architecture (ISA) is the foundation of all chip or System-on-Chip (SoC) products. It is therefore one of the most fundamental design choices you will make. If you are considering using an open-source ISA, such as RISC-V, it is critical to understand the key factors you should consider as part of your go-to-market strategy.

It seems odd for ARM - riding high as it is - to attack RISC-V like this, which seems to barely be making a dent anywhere.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-27
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RE: Comment by kurkosdr
By zima on 2018-07-10 03:42:42
Hm, though Chinese Androids don't have proprietary Google services, and it's still kept together... (at the very least, Statcounter counts Chinese users as Android :P )
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE: Comment by Kroc
By kuiash on 2018-07-10 09:08:25
"There's no such thing as bad publicity". (that's glib of course, however, some of ARM's negatives also look like positives!)
Permalink - Score: 2
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RE: Comment by kurkosdr
By b00gie on 2018-07-10 13:20:55
But the problem with android is exactly the fact that has so many parts closed and for that to happen google pretty much forked linux kernel.
Provided opensource drivers that could be easily ported from one android version to the next following the linux project standards that potentially could bring them in kernel, then android would be truely fragmented but in the way linux/bsd distros work, that is liberated from the choices made by someone else based on his priorities.
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RE: Wikipedia the second casualty in the attack...
By JLF65 on 2018-07-10 13:51:49
Twelve undo ops in the last two days and counting! You can bet the mods will be keeping a closer eye on the RISC-V page until this gets settled.
Permalink - Score: 5
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Lots of early work
By kallisti5 on 2018-07-10 15:55:31
RISC-V has a *lot* of momentum on the development side of the engineering pipeline.

Lots of people are looking at it from the "cheap licensing" perspective. Within the last year: Linux kernel support, GCC support, binutils support, LLVM support.
Permalink - Score: 3
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Weh?
By fretinator on 2018-07-10 17:36:01
ARM posts an article stating why they rock and a competitor doesn't. Shocking, I know.
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and it's gone.
By kallisti5 on 2018-07-10 19:32:45
.... and it's gone. Guessing someone at ARM realized how bad of an idea it was :-)


Luckily the internet doesn't forget:

https://web.archive.org/web/20180...

Edited 2018-07-10 19:35 UTC
Permalink - Score: 6
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RE: Comment by FlyingJester
By CaptainN- on 2018-07-10 21:32:12
Someone felt threatened at ARM. This is a knee jerk kind of action which is quite common in general. I don't see anything surprising at all.
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RE: Lots of early work
By FlyingJester on 2018-07-10 21:52:01
I think that from a business perspective, license cost is probably not a huge win for RISC-V. Designs like SuperH and UltraSparc already exist as open source hardware designs without license costs, and already have full support in Linux and BSDs (along with Illumos and several others for UltraSparc), and mature compiler toolchain support.

Edited 2018-07-10 21:53 UTC
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RE: Comment by kurkosdr
By piratepuppy on 2018-07-10 22:34:25
When did fragmentation of Android become an issue? Far as I can tell everything runs fine across Android devices from Google, HTC, Samsung, etc.

And since when is GMS the only thing holding android together? I've seen it used quite successfully on HMI's (lexmark printers come to mind), automotive infotainment devices, and Amazon's own Fire OS is GMS free and quite sucessful in fire tablets, sticks and STB's.

The thing about Android that sucks is its goofy architecture of a non-standard Java VM on top of a forked Linux kernel. Back then it made sense when the mobile market was new, cpu and ram severely limited and multiple isa's were kicked around besides arm. Now it's all arm and the native interface is used extensively by cross platform frameworks which ironically negate the need for isa portability and thus the entire java stack which is dead weight at this point. I get why it was done, but the implementation was sloppy and short sighted; it feels like a hack. And it's replacement, fuschia, isn't exactly exciting from an OS perspective though it looks a lot cleaner than android.
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