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Firefox experiments with recommended content
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-08-08 22:23:54

With the latest Firefox experiment, Advance, you can explore more of the web efficiently, with real-time recommendations based on your current page and your most recent web history.

With Advance we're taking you back to our Firefox roots and the experience that started everyone surfing the web. That time when the World Wide Web was uncharted territory and we could freely discover new topics and ideas online. The Internet was a different place.

I get what Mozilla is trying to do here, and they obviously have rightfully earned the trust of many over the years, but is this kind of functionality really something people who choose to use Firefox are looking for, or even tolerate? This seems like something that doesn't align with the average Firefox user at all.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-21
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building bigger echo chambers ?
By Galor on 2018-08-09 08:43:08
and even that, do I really want to give more technocrats the ability to control what people see? even horses get the blinders removed once in a while..
Permalink - Score: 0
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Great Idea!
By Brendan on 2018-08-09 11:20:03
Hi,

There's far too much bad porn on the web (low resolution, poor acting, shaking camera, bad plot). Porn that's been recommended by Firefox would be a huge time saver for a lot of people.

- Brendan
Permalink - Score: 6
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Comment by JPisini
By JPisini on 2018-08-09 11:45:18
I have been using Firefox since it was sold in stores as Netscape but some of the choices lately have me using other browsers more and more. I want to control what I see on the web not have things pushed on me.
Permalink - Score: 0
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RE: Comment by JPisini
By grub on 2018-08-09 11:56:40
> I want to control what I see on the web not have things pushed on me.
That is exactly why I left Facebook.
Permalink - Score: 0
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RE: Comment by JPisini
By woegjiub on 2018-08-09 13:27:02
Unfortunately the only alternatives are chrome, edge, safari, or a community browser that wraps one of those engines.

While there are a lot of great browsers (like qutebrowser, epiphany, etc.) based on webkit and blink, they don't have the resources of mozilla so they're left piggybacking off of google and apple.

As an NPO whose purpose is ensuring the web is free and open, Mozilla are still vitally necessary.
Permalink - Score: 4
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RE[2]: Mozilla walks a fine line
By supercompman on 2018-08-09 14:42:47
The only platform listed that has any substantial number of end-users is iOS, and on that platform, Apple won't let Mozilla bring their rendering engine over. For all intents and purposes, Firefox on iOS is a completely separate product from Firefox on desktop or Android. The only useful things that Firefox can provide users on iOS is Firefox Sync and a little more privacy than average. It's not enough for most users to care.

Adding support for all of the other platforms you listed would be a tremendous amount of developer effort for very little gain. FreeBSD has a few desktop users, but Haiku isn't even ready for any end users in a serious environment. ArcaOS is just life support for OS/2 and is not really gaining users other than people already well embedded in OS/2. ReactOS should be Windows compatible if it worked properly, but it is FAR from production ready. Most ARM platforms will be running a Linux distro where Firefox is already packaged and available, or Android where Firefox is also available.

I feel that Rust is one of the few really positive developments from Mozilla and I applaud the use of it in Firefox. The language completely eliminates whole classes of security issues while providing an easier way to write reliable concurrent code. Both of these are things that current languages (and browsers written in those languages) had a very difficult time providing, but both are critical especially for code running in an untrusted environment (any networked application) and for an application to make the best use of modern hardware which is growing more parallel all of the time.

In regard to extensions, Mozilla has already worked for quite a long time with those developers to get the most commonly used extensions running properly on the latest versions of Firefox. Mozilla has also accepted feedback, and actually implemented, infrastructure to allow other extensions that couldn't be ported before to be brought to the new extension architecture. Most other extensions have been abandoned by their original developers... I'm not really sure what more you'd like to see Mozilla do here.

As for "pissing us all off" in the open source community... have they? Mozilla has certainly had their missteps, but are they actively burning bridges and/or not contributing to the community as a whole? I like to consider myself part of the community, and I'm certainly not pissed off. Most (but not all) of their decisions are logical, reasonable decisions that have to be made in an organization the size of Mozilla, running a project the size of Firefox, looking out for what's in the best interest of end users and the long-term health of the project, all while working with finite resources. Do they make some poor choices at times? Of course, but the majority of them seem pretty reasonable when the big picture is taken into consideration.
Permalink - Score: 3
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Spotify
By Nit.0 on 2018-08-09 14:50:10
Spotifys Daniel Ek "recommends" aswell.

Rhianna anyone?
Permalink - Score: -1
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RE: Eh
By CaptainN- on 2018-08-09 16:45:58
I don't know if it's just nostalgia. Most of use drink the internet through the Google fire hose (and maybe Facebook/Twitter). This looks like an attempt to pry control of our discovery away from those large corporations, even if it is cloaked in nostalgic framing.
Permalink - Score: 4
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Except...
By darknexus on 2018-08-09 20:22:18
Mozilla don't have my trust anymore. They did, even after the Pocket integration, but then came Firefox studies, which would randomly turn itself back on. Then came sponsored content in new tab pages. Now comes the "voluntary" submission of your data to a third party, one whose trustworthiness is unknown. And how long before "voluntary" becomes "opt out" the way the sponsored content is, and then becomes integrated permanently? Once this affiliate has your data, they can do whatever the heck they want with it, and Mozilla have plausible deniability should the worst happen. How convenient... for someone.
Permalink - Score: 0
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RE[2]: Comment by JPisini
By JPisini on 2018-08-11 11:27:10
Not that I want to but if i have to I can go back to using lynx or elink and surf the web through a text based browser. I would rather give up graphics than freedom.
Permalink - Score: 1

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