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Apple blocks Linux on new Macs with T2 security chips
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-11-05 23:10:31

People have found out that you can only install macOS and Windows 10 on Apple's new Macs equipped with the T2 security chip.

By default, Microsoft Windows isn't even bootable on the new Apple systems until enabling support for Windows via the Boot Camp Assistant macOS software. The Boot Camp Assistant will install the Windows Production CA 2011 certificate that is used to authenticate Microsoft bootloaders. But this doesn't setup the Microsoft-approved UEFI certificate that allows verification of code by Microsoft partners, including what is used for signing Linux distributions wishing to have UEFI SecureBoot support for Windows PCs.

Right now, there is no way to run Linux on the new Mac hardware. Even if you disable Secure Boot, you can still only install macOS and Windows 10 - not Linux. Luckily, Linux users don't have to rely on Macs for good hardware anymore - there are tons of Windows laptops out there that offer the same level of quality with better specifications at lower prices that run Linux just fine.

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Comment by tidux
By tidux on 2018-11-05 23:35:28
Well, that's just more evidence for me to stick with my trusty old X220 until we get laptops with HiDPI screens, Ryzen-or-later APUs, and full Linux support.
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Okay...
By Andersenep on 2018-11-06 00:06:36
Is there seriously anyone out there that wants to pay the premium for Apple hardware and then slap Linux on it? Why on Earth would you do such a thing??? Would you pay for an iPhone and complain that you can't install some Android custom ROM or whatever too?

Edited 2018-11-06 00:09 UTC
Permalink - Score: 5
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Oh, and by the way...
By Andersenep on 2018-11-06 00:28:16
Update: A reader has pointed out that it's possible to disable Secure Boot on T2-equipped devices making it possible to boot and install Linux distributions. To run Linux you must first access the Startup Security Utility and choose the 'No Security' option, here are the instructions on how to access to the utility:

Turn on your Mac, then press and hold Command (⌘)-R immediately after you see the Apple logo to start up from macOS Recovery.
When you see the macOS Utilities window, choose Utilities > Startup Security Utility from the menu bar.
When you're asked to authenticate, click Enter macOS Password, then choose an administrator account and enter its password.


But don't let that get in the way of your Apple hate....

Edited 2018-11-06 00:30 UTC
Permalink - Score: -1
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Link
By Moochman on 2018-11-06 00:40:26
The second link is a little off.. there's an extra "http://www.osnews.com/-%22" in the beginning
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RE: Okay...
By iampivot on 2018-11-06 00:40:27
True, nobody buys macbook pros for the hardware, only to get macos. Reluctantly, as the macbook pros are too slim these days, with no upgrade options.
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RE: Okay...
By Moochman on 2018-11-06 00:44:08
Well, it used to be the case that MacBooks had some of the nicest hardware out there. I'm pretty sure I've seen a few developers using Macs with Linux over the years, although it certainly isn't common. Nowadays though if you're not buying it for macOS the only thing really going for it in comparison to a good ThinkPad or XPS is the resale value.

Edited 2018-11-06 00:44 UTC
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RE: Oh, and by the way...
By Moochman on 2018-11-06 00:44:53
It says right at the bottom of the article, Update 2 - apparently that doesn't work either.

Edited 2018-11-06 00:45 UTC
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RE: Oh, and by the way...
By Thom_Holwerda on 2018-11-06 00:55:29
> But don't let that get in the way of your Apple hate....

Disabling Secure Boot doesn't work. This is said so explicitly in both the linked Phoronix article as well as the link I added to the OSNews blurb.
Permalink - Score: 4
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Will we stand for this?
By Alfman on 2018-11-06 01:57:29
I keep saying it: if we won't fight for computer openness or if too many of us just take it for granted, we will loose our control over our computers. It's happening too slowly for most people to pay attention, but over time our computers have become much more restrictive for owner control. I find it disturbing that these powerful corporations are persistently chipping away our rights...and we just take it.

Throughout all of our secure boot debates on osnews, I really thought microsoft would be the first to permanently force secure boot restrictions on (x86) PCs. I really hadn't suspected it would be apple. I'd be furious if I was an apple user right now. Once apple tests the waters and finds that it can get away with restricting owner boot choices, microsoft may follow. As with all these restrictions on owner rights, once we allow them to be normalized, the reality is we're not going to get them back.

If we don't firmly condemn this now, we may ultimately end up with both apple and microsoft mandating hardware locks, which would render almost all new PCs vendor locked to them.

https://www.netmarketshare.com/op...


Every time I report on this, someone thinks I'm being too dramatic, yet every time events pass that move us closer in this direction; we're loosing ground. Look at the long term consequences if these things are allowed to go unchecked.

Edited 2018-11-06 02:02 UTC
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RE: Okay...
By Alfman on 2018-11-06 02:22:43
Andersenep,

> Is there seriously anyone out there that wants to pay the premium for Apple hardware and then slap Linux on it? Why on Earth would you do such a thing??? Would you pay for an iPhone and complain that you can't install some Android custom ROM or whatever too?

If I had one, I'd probably be interested in getting it dual booting. Lots of people at linux user groups do it. Whether you think it's worthwhile or not is a different matter, but it should be their prerogative to do with their computers as they see fit.

I worked on an SDR project for a company that issued macbooks exclusively to their devs, yet the software was being designed for a linux host because it would ultimately run on a linux server. So it was very useful for them to be able to boot/develop linux on the macbook. It's actually the same reason I own a windows laptop, yet dual boot into linux as needed.

Edited 2018-11-06 02:23 UTC
Permalink - Score: 6

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