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AMD outlines its future: 7nm Zen 2, Zen 3, Zen 4
By Thom Holwerda on 2018-11-07 00:44:24

On the CPU side of things, AMD talked extensively about the forthcoming Zen 2 architecture. The goal of the original Zen architecture was to get AMD, at the very least, competitive with what Intel had to offer. AMD knew that Zen would not take the performance lead from Intel, but the pricing and features of its chips made them nonetheless attractive, especially in workloads that highlighted certain shortcomings of Intel's parts (fewer memory channels, less I/O bandwidth). Zen 2 promises to be not merely competitive with Intel, but superior to it.

Key to this is TSMC's 7nm process, which offers twice the transistor density of the 14nm process the original Zen parts used. For the same performance level, power is reduced by about 50 percent, or, conversely, at the same power consumption, performance is increased by about 25 percent. TSMC's 14nm and 12nm processes both trail behind Intel's 14nm process in terms of performance per watt, but with 7nm, TSMC will take the lead.

These Zen 2 processors using the 7nm process will hit the market in 2019, so it seems like next year is the perfect moment to make any transitions from Intel to AMD. Intel has been milking its 14nm process for all its worth, because it just can't seem to get its 10nm process to work properly. With AMD moving to 7nm, it definitely seems the company will actually leapfrog Intel next year.

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Read Comments: 1-10 -- 11-20 -- 21-22
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Go AMD!
By Sauron on 2018-11-07 06:33:21
Nice to see AMD making a comeback.
I'll be needing to build a new system sooner or later to replace my first gen i7 setup.
With Intel profiteering and ripping folk off like there's no tomorrow, and with the advances AMD have made and reasonable pricing, I will be looking at building a AMD based system this time around!
Permalink - Score: 5
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Vega
By Ishan333 on 2018-11-07 09:22:04
What they really need to push at the same time is VEGA. I've seen a hack pushing 2.4 times the normal power rating into a VEGA 56 and it was beating a RTX 2070 in some cases. that means if they get the power draw down 50% it could compete.
Their next generation of GPU could get on par with nVidia performance wise, then the war is going to be on technologies (namely realtime ray/path tracing) instead of raw power and that's a good thing.
Permalink - Score: 2
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Comment by kurkosdr
By kurkosdr on 2018-11-07 10:04:06
Too bad most laptops will still be Intel due to shady under the table deals...
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE: Comment by kurkosdr
By Kochise on 2018-11-07 11:21:45
Corruption, sorry, "lobbying" in the USA ? Impossibru!!!
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RE: Comment by kurkosdr
By ahferroin7 on 2018-11-07 13:24:34
Given my own experience, AMD is not yet consistently beating Intel at energy efficiency, although that seems to be at least partly because they still aren't quite as good at single-core performance.
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RE[2]: Comment by kurkosdr
By Kochise on 2018-11-07 15:08:24
Is single core performance still a thing nowadays ? I can understand that showing a big score in benchmarks is a marketing plus, but I tend to favor multi-threading capability to handle complex real-life problems. There it's hard to differ between Intel and AMD because both are rather good.

The software side will also have a big impact on performances.

I also concur with the power usage their should improve (aka lessen).
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RE: Vega
By Sauron on 2018-11-07 15:33:48
Things may change a little when Navi is released, that next generation of cards is aimed more at the gaming market and should close the gap between them and Nvidia some! Vega is been targeted more at the compute and business end by the looks of things.
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RE[3]: Comment by kurkosdr
By ahferroin7 on 2018-11-07 15:40:23
It really depends on what you are doing. There are still a lot of things out there (especially on Windows) that really don't parallelize very well (if at all). Games are still particularly bad about this.
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RE[4]: Comment by kurkosdr
By Kochise on 2018-11-07 16:11:11
Games are getting multi-threaded more on more (business logic + 3d object management + physics + ai + ...) because Unity, Unreal engine or else are. Single threaded performance would only impact old games than used to ran on much weaker hardware, hence should benefit the performance increase anyway.

I know I'm kinda picky on this, but even WinZip or WinRar are multi threaded now, so it would make sense only if you are still using a pretty old configuration with no updated software from the 32 bits era. If that's the case, I repeat that those would benefit the increased performance anyway.

Now if you insist on using an old software stack for strange reasons (ie. running old legacy binaries) I can understand your concerns, but I bet upgrading or finding an up to date alternative that will benefit added cores is the way to go.
Permalink - Score: 3
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RE[2]: Vega
By kuiash on 2018-11-07 16:22:17
Navi says "Hey! Listen!"
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