www. O S N E W S .com
News Features Interviews
BlogContact Editorials

Inside the Intel 1405: die photos of a shift register memory
By Thom Holwerda on 2014-12-22 00:25:45

In 1970, MOS memory chips were just becoming popular, but were still very expensive. Intel had released their first product the previous year, the 3101 RAM chip with 64 bits of storage.[1] For this chip (with enough storage to hold the word "aardvark") you'd pay $99.50. To avoid these astronomical prices, some computers used the cheaper alternative of shift register memory. Intel's 1405 shift register provided 512 bits of storage - 8 times as much as their RAM chip - at a significantly lower price. In a shift register memory, the bits go around and around in a circle, with one bit available at each step. The big disadvantage is that you need to wait for the bit you want to come around, which can take half a millisecond.

Great article.

5  Comments - Printer friendly - Related stories
Recent related stories
- Intel made smart glasses that look normal - 2018-02-07
- Intel claims other chips also affected by design flaw - 2018-01-03
- Intel processor design flaw forces Linux, Windows redesign - 2018-01-03
- Intel plans to end legacy BIOS support by 2020 - 2017-11-20
- Intel, AMD co-develop new processor with Intel CPU and AMD GPU - 2017-11-06
- More related articles
 

Tell a friend
Your full name:
Your email address:
Your friend's email:
Anti-spam measure:
5+2=

News Features Interviews
BlogContact Editorials


WAP site - RSS feed
© OSNews LLC 1997-2007. All Rights Reserved.
The readers' comments are owned and a responsibility of whoever posted them.
Prefer the desktop version of OSNews?